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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)
now it's time for us to go. bye. ♪ turning a 20-foot wall into a canvas takes vision. so will getting into college. i've got what it takes. so do you. >> "teen kids news" is about to get started, and here's what we've got for you. >> would you eat a bowl of cookies for breakfast? wait till you find out what could be in your cereal. >> we'll see how flowers, rocks, gold, and even bugs were used to make beautiful books. >> meet the people who make sure no teen gets priced out of the prom. >> while the movie "spider-man" may make you think more kindly of spiders, getting bitten by one is no fun. i'll tell you what you'll need to do. >> coming up, i'll show you the unusual way they celebrate the new year in the land of mozart -- vienna, austria. >> and there's lots more ahead, so stay with us. >> welcome to "teen kids news." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm livia. here's this week's top story. >> you might think of it as a healthy way to start the day, but you could be eating a bowl full of trouble. tyler has the disturbing truth about some of our favorite cereals. >> i think it's ver
flowers, rocks, gold, and even bugs were used to make beautiful books. >> meet the people who make sure no teen gets priced out of the prom. >> while the movie "spider-man" may make you think more kindly of spiders, getting bitten by one is no fun. i'll tell you what you'll need to do. >> coming up, i'll show you the unusual way they celebrate the new year in the land of mozart -- vienna, austria. >> and there's lots more ahead, so stay with us. >> welcome to "tn kids news." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm livia. here's this week's top story. >> you might think of it as a healthy way to start the day, but you could be eating a bowl full of trouble. tyler has the disturbing truth about some of our favorite cereals. >> i think it's very nutritional. >> yeah, but it depends on what cereal. >> if you think your favorite cereal is healthy, here's a shock. it might be more than half sugar. and that's not sweet. >> it's been linked to obesity, diabetes. and when you eat tons and tons of it, you're obviously more at risk of developing type 2 diabetes or becoming more obese. >> that's why 84 popular cer
be used to prevent crises. there are a lot of discussions to come, for example, greece and what the troicha what they will say. spain could be next. with all of these discussions to come, it's very important that they send a signal saying that they're taking actions that are credible and they stand together. >> there has been a general sense of relief that it is now in place, but what about the reaction from the stock markets? we have more on that. >> how could the euro fund create confidence? it became clear shortly after. shortly after they signed the agreement in luxembourg, the rating agency fitch gave it's first credit rating -- aaa, the best you can get. the esm really is an important component but the question remains how and when the economy will start to get in gear again especially in countries like spain, italy, and france. it is why the introduction really did not inspire on the stock trading floors this monday. >> we will have more on the implications later in the show with reports on portugal and greece. for now, a closer look at the market numbers. the dax 1.5% do
a series of car bombs target government forces in aleppo. >> the u.s. revs up what europe stalls. -- while europe's tallest. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- it is the day the people of germany celebrate the unity. 22 years ago, east and west reunited with the blessing of their european neighbors. now there has been a pill to draw the right lessons in the crisis europe faces. >> the president of the parliament says his country must strive for greater unity in europe and he warned against perverting -- reverting to old national rivalries as the weaker members of the eurozone struggle. >> the speech in munich is the center of the celebration. >> the ceremony began with music from richard strauss's opera. more than 1500 people attended the ceremony, including germany's top political leaders. the bavarian state premier compared the process of german unification to that of creating a united europe. then he gave the keynote address. >> we are german europeans. we must devote to the nfl -- unification of europe the same effort we made in german unification. he add
of budapest. >> and there's lots more ahead, so stay with us. >> welcome to "teen kids news." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm livia. here's this week's top story. >> it could be a key to cheaper energy, or an environmental plague. how you view fracking depends on how you weigh the pros and cons. scott drills into a controversy that could affect us all. >> this is not about the kind of gas used by most cars. it's about natural gas, also called "methane." it's a fuel used for everything from cooking food, to heating homes, to even generating electricity. natural gas comes from deep underground. it's trapped amid layers of shale rock. to release the gas, you have to break apart the rock. that process is called "fracking," and that's what the controversy is all about. >> ♪ water goes into the pipe ♪ the pipe into the ground ♪ the pressure creates fissures 7,000 feet down ♪ ♪ the cracks release the gas that powers your town ♪ >> that's from a video produced by propublica. they're a group looking into whether fracking is safe. according to those in favor of fracking, it's not a threat. >> f
's refugees worsens, and the eu calls on countries to work harder to resolve the crisis. >> the u.s. election campaign is gathering momentum in its final two weeks. u.s. president barack obama and his republican challenger mitt romney have had their final tv debate. >> they sparred over foreign policy where the president is perceived to have a clear evanish, but with the economy on the minds of most -- most voters, the candidates repeatedly reverted to domestic policy to win support. >> with two weeks until the election, the last debate between u.s. president barack obama and challenger mitt romney is dominating the news cycle. the topic was foreign policy, and viewer polls showed romney struggled to distance himself from the president. >> romney has pretty much to reach his breaking point. he has no argument anymore, and he never answers questions straight up. >> i thought last night, it showed that both romney and obama are pretty much in sync with foreign policy. >> with a race that is still too close to call, both candidates refused to give ground. president obama highlighted his track re
on the line for us from istanbul. put this incident into perspective for us. what does it mean for to keep's role in the syrian conflict now -- turkey's role in the syrian conflict? >> turkey is getting ever deeper into the syrian conflict. we have the first incident on turkish soil where turkey took action against another state. there was a similar case last year when they stopped an iranian plane on its way to syria. this time, russia is involved. the turkish officials with whom i've been speaking are very eager to play this down, to say that maybe the russians did not know what was on the plane. they will work it out with the russians, so they are very easy not to cause another crisis. >> we understand there is a meeting scheduled for december 3 between the leaders. what do you think this incident will do to relations between russia and turkey? >> i think there will be a crisis, at least in the short term, but i think both sides are interested in good relations. turkey needs russia because it depends on russian gas for its energy supply. russia -- for russia, turkey is very important, s
>> in "speak of the week," teens tell us about their dream... vacation. >> we'll show you some kids making a difference while getting their hands dirty. >> hey, everyone. it's gabrielle douglas here, two-time olympic gold medalist, and you're watching "teen kids news." >> welcome to "teen kids news." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm livia. here's this week's top story. >> it's a behavior that's illegal in the workplace, but a new study finds it's shockingly common in school. it's called sexual harassment, and as carina reports, it's all around us. >> when somebody tries to touch somebody in a sexual way. >> when someone is trying to force you to do sexual stuff. >> physically touched in areas you don't want to be touched. >> i think sexual harassment is anything that can make a girl or a guy feel uncomfortable on any level -- if someone's touching them or even inappropriate comments. >> she's right. simply put, sexual harassment is teasing or touching in a way that makes someone feel uncomfortable. >> i look at sexual harassment as a kind of bullying. verbal harassment can be calling people
in tokyo. people in the u.s. northeast are looking out their windows and seeing the blurry images of a storm headed their way. they're facing an onslaught of rain and wind as hurricane sandy pushing inland. two people are missing after a ship sank off north carolina. several municipalities in the storm's path have declared a state of emergency. forecasters say the storm is unusually large. it's expected to cut across new jersey over the next several hours. more than 6,000 houses in the state have already lost electricity. u.s. president barack obama made a direct appeal to people in the hurricane's path. >> the most important message that i have for the public right now is please listen to what your state and local officials are saying. when they tell you to evacuate, you need to evacuate. >> 370,000 new yorkers who live close to the water have left. the wind was so strong it bent the metal on a crane at this construction site. city officials have shet down the transit system. businesses and shops have closed. workers are piling up sandbags in front of subway entrances and buildin
were reported, but turkish soldiers returned fire across the border. as the, the u.s. security council condemned syria for firing mortars at turkey earlier this week, an attack in which five people died. for the very latest, let's go straight to ankara where thomas is standing by for us. tell us more on this latest incident. what more do you know? >> we know that federal villages from the area have told the turkish media that they heard explosions in the vicinity just over the border. nobody knows if it is quite true yet if those explosions came from turkish rounds fighting with syria or indeed fighting raging inside syria between rebels and government forces. it is a little bit unclear at the moment. what seems to be clear, though, is that turkey is making it very clear to syria that it is not accepting any more of this cross-border shelling.% the response was immediate by turkish artillery into syria itself. >> let's look into the warning there -- he has been saying since the middle of the week that turkey is not looking for work, but today, he is now saying it is close to war. what
to try to get better relations with russia because it is a very important market for us. it is important for us to have good ties to russia to get up our economy again. we also tend to go for the way which saakashvili did. we want to go further towards european union and nato. >> thank you very much for that. staying in moscow, a russian court has postponed the punk band pussy riot's appeal after one of them fired her lawyer. they have been given nine days to find a new lawyer. the anti-kremlin trio have been sentenced to two years in jail on a number of charges including disturbing the peace. they staged a protest against vladimir putin earlier this year. >> the women from pussy riot came to the appeal hearing without any great expectations that they would be released, but what came next was surely a shock. one of the trio had decided to break with the defense team. >> i do not exactly know what has happened. we met of three women on friday. one of them confirmed we would continue to work together. something must have happened over the weekend. >> the lawyers believe someone may have pr
. there are worries about the failure of u.s. policy makers to agree so far on a fiscal plan. >> reporter: he ran through a list of challenges in developed countries. government spending cuts, a weak financial system, high unemployment. emerging economies such as china drove the recovery from the global downturn, but they have cooled off. >> clearly the downside if the global economy were to slow much more than expected, then additional policy measures will be needed. >> reporter: he said he was encouraged by the easy money policies of many banks and pieces to what he called a complex puzzle are starting to fall into place. he said if the puzzle can be completed, then one can hope that the worst might be behind us. ron madison, nhk world, tokyo. >>> this high level gathering wouldn't have been happening here in tokyo if things had gone according to plan. accordi organizers originally decided to go in egypt. immediately raised his hand and proposed japan would host. we spoke with the vice minister of finance for international finance. >> reporter: vice minister nakoa was instrumental to bringing t
--www.ncicap.org-- >> thank you for being with us. we start with a spectacular fall from grace for the cycling legend, lance armstrong. he has been stripped of all of his seventh tour de france titles and banned for life by the international cycling union. >> the cycling world governing body said it was ratifying sanctions taken earlier this month by the u.s. anti-dumping agency -- anti-doping agency, usada. >> it had claimed that armstrong was at the heart of the "most sophisticated and successful" of doping programs the sport had seen. >> uci has ousted him from the sport. >> uci will ban armstrong from cycling and strip him of his seventh tour de france titles. lance armstrong has no place in cycling. >> the uci upheld sanctions imposed by usada, accuses armstrong of being at the heart of a systematic doping culture. usada alleges the rider's victories from 1999-2005, after his recovery from cancer, or helped by illegal substances -- were helped by illegal substances. his teammates say he was bullying them into keeping quiet. there has been criticism of the uci for accepting
now it's time for us to go. woof-woof. bye. ♪ >> get ready for "teen kids news." here's what's coming up. >> i'll tell you how some unlikely animals are helping young cancer patients. >> the game of kings comes to the classroom. we'll...check it out. >> i'll show you which state flag has a special message for women. >> we'll put the spotlight on teens with a talent for global giving. >> get up close and personal with singer/songwriter jack skuller. >> that and more, next on "teen kids news." >> welcome to "teen kids news." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm siena. we'll start with our top story. >> imagine having to go to the hospital for treatments again and again and again. that's what kids with cancer have to do. as you might think, the visits are anything but fun. but as veronique reports, one hospital came up with a project that's not only unusual -- it's big, very big. >> you've probably heard of art therapy. it's a way to help patients deal with the difficulties of coping with serious illnesses. meet ian. he's an artist who works at the md anderson children's cancer hospital in h
favored international rivals. thanks for joining us. we start in syria where the military has agreed to a cease- fire over the four-day muslim holiday. >> international peace envoy lackdar brahimi has held talks to mediated truce starting on friday. >> all the one rebel group has rejected the proposal, the united nations hopes it could create the basis for dialogue and a longer lasting peace agreement. >> it is a statement many had been hoping for. an announcement on state television -- declaration confirming a cease-fire is to take effect at midnight -- reads a declaration confirming a cease-fire is to take effect at midnight. smoke and the sounds of fighting visible across what appears to be damascus, but it is not possible to verify when or where the video was recorded. i and other syrian hot spots, fighting continued throughout the day -- in other syrian hot spots. rebels in aleppo say they have taken control of several neighborhoods there. videos like these make scenes like this seem almost unreal. syrians risk a trip to the market for some last-minute holiday shopping. >> we ar
and then using his influence as prime minister to cover up the alleged offense -- the so-called rubygate trial. >> he is almost like the cat with nine lives. does this ruling in his political life at all? >> i think the announcement he made earlier this week did more so than today's conviction, and i think that mr. berlusconi has been seen in recent months -- the support for his party is declining, despite his fading charisma. i think gradually, italians are confining him to their past. >> john hooper in rome, thank you very much for that. a powerful car bomb has exploded in the syrian capital damascus, killing at least five people and wounding 32 more. >> the attack comes on day one of what was supposed to be a four-day cease-fire for the muslim holiday. >> activists say at least 70 people have been killed in violence across the country. then the bomb exploded when it shot district of damascus, mainly populated by sunni muslims. it detonated by a mosque and a playground set up for the festival. state television said that the victims included children. along with the bomb blast, there were rep
netanyahu, responding to that issue, but using most of his time to speak out about iran's nuclear intentions. >> the relevant question is not when iran will get the bomb -- the relevant question is, at what stage can we no longer stop iran from getting the bomb? the red line must be drawn on iran's nuclear-enrichment program. >> the taliban claiming responsibility for a blast in eastern afghanistan. a suicide bomber ramming his motorcycle, packed with explosives, into a patrol of afghan and international forces. the attack coming a day after a firefight broke out at an eastern afghanistan checkpoint, killing five people, including a u.s. soldier, marking the 2,000th u.s. troop death in the 11-year-old conflict. the u.s. supreme court back in session, starting a new term with a number of controversial cases awaiting the justices. one of the term's most anticipated cases -- a fight over the affirmative action program at the university of texas. for "teen kids news," i'm julie banderas, "fox news channel in the classroom." >> could you describe the flag that flies over your state capitol? maybe
the u.s. state department said it considered -- for more. >> the u.s. state department said it considered turkey's response to be proportionate. thursday morning, turkey launched a second round of shelling. some reports say several syrian soldiers were killed. >> the retaliation came after five turkish civilians were killed after syrian mortar fire. turkey says that syria has now apologized for that incident and has promised it would not happen again. >> it is a small turkish town bordering war-torn syria. it has come under the line of fire. syrian borders struck a residential neighborhood, killing five civilians -- syrian mortars struck a residential neighborhood, killing five civilians. cross-border buyer has struck 37 times since the start of the syrian uprising -- cross-border fire has struck turkey several times since the start of the syrian uprising. the government says this bill is not a declaration of war against syria. >> turkey is not a country that wants war. it is a country that wants peace, but we're also a part of a country that is visible -- capable of doing w
designed the flag, and she thought it was a great symbol of branding, which cattle ranchers all used to keep track of their animals, but, also, the bison was known as the monarch of the plains, and she thought that was a great symbol for her state. >> name "wyoming" comes from a native american word for "great plain." today it would be considered politically incorrect, but the flag's designer paid tribute to those once called "red men" with the red border. she said the red also signifies the blood of the pioneers who fought to claim the land. we can easily understand why a cowboy and a miner are pictured in the center. but what are those tiny words in the banner? >> the phrase on the wyoming state flag is "equal rights," and this speaks to wyoming's history as a place that was very friendly to women. it was the first territory to give women the right to hold public office and the right to vote way back in 1869. in order to attain statehood, it's necessary to have 60,000 citizens, so the leaders of the territory knew this would help to get people to come live there. and before you kno
that will allow us to have hope, and hopefully, we have good news for columbia -- colombia. >> for almost half a century, leftist farc guerrillas have waged war, financing their campaign through drug trafficking and hostage-taking. their most prominent captive was the former colombian presidential candidate who spent six years in a jungle camp before her release. the fate of other hostages is still unknown. their families hope their concerns will be heard in oslo. >> we feel the pain, and we need to know the truth. these people need to be reunited with their loved ones. we are appealing to the government and to farc to put this at the top of the agenda and listen to victims. >> peace negotiations have failed three times before. now, the people looking to oslo for the long-awaited break through. >> colombians are longing for peace, but what exactly are the biggest obstacles that the government and rebels are bringing to the negotiating table? >> we put that question to our next guest. >> i think there are at least two big obstacles. one is to solve one of the biggest challenges of colombian his
in this group who accepts that lebanon is used as a battleground and that lebanese pay the price. >> the syrian government denied it had any hand in the bombing. >> international envoy brahimi i in syria pushing for a temporary cease-fire. >> meanwhile, syria war -- syrian warplanes continue to fire on rebel positions. unconfirmed reports indicate that 150 people were killed on thursday. well, europe is set to get a banking regulator next year. at a two-day summit in brussels, eu leaders came up with a time line for the body to be gradually implemented in 2013. >> the details are still to be hashed out, but here's what we know right now -- the european central bank will function as supervisor in chief and have the power to intervene in any of the eurozone's 6000 banks. damages coming up with a time line was a compromise between france and germany, which had been at odds at the scope of the ecb's new powers and when they will be put in place. and it was a long night for the chancellor, but in the end, angela merkel got what she wanted. a eurozone banking supervisor will not go into operation in
-president of candidates exchanged verbal blows in the u.s. presidential race. across europe this friday, there is collation and disbelief. the european union has won the nobel peace prize. >> most leaders are bogged down in efforts to deal with the eurozone debt crisis. >> there was a spontaneous and unprecedented round of applause. >> one i woke up, i did not expected to be such a good day. we received the news of the award of the global peace prize. >> it came as a surprise to many in brussels on rent for its historic role in honoring the continent. >> they have helped to transform most of europe from a continental or continental peace. >> the president of the european parliament's interrupted the business to to vienna to respond. >> for me, this is also a personal thing. everything i have worked for, all the energy into pushing this forward has been honored today. >> there was a last-minute change to the schedule. currently in finland ahead of the european council summit, the finnish prime minister played down the importance of the eu's achievement. >> we had the two world wars. the
a billion euros. he says the money will be used for consolidation and he is not planning any new acquisitions in the next two years. that ipo could be a hopeful sign for shares in the coming months. our markets correspondent has more from frankfurt. >> the ipo is a sign of hope for many traders. they are hoping for more ipos to come. 20% of the german mobile phone operator will soon be sold on the stock market according to its parent company. of the ipo process is planned to start as early as this week. all of this is good news for people in the trading floors because ipos only work when there is a certain not of confidence on the markets. a certain amount of reliability. with all of these new players on the stock market, many people here are hoping for stock prices to continue to rise. >> continuing to rise is not what they're doing now in europe. as you can see on the board in the background, putting on the brakes -- the dax down almost 0.3%. the eurostoxx 50 also sliding. the same in new york, the dow jones is losing its gains from yesterday. it was a strong start to the week.
which can then be used to form all the tissues of the body. >> the nobel society has today decided to award the nobel prize in physiology or medicine 2012 jointly to john b.gergen and shinya yamanaka. >> he is 50 years old. he's a professor at kyoto university. he established the method to produce ips cells. they're capable of becoming specialized cells which can then be used to create tissues such as heart muscle. he succeeded by introducing four types of genes to cells removed from parts of the body. he reported success with mice in 2006 and a year later generated human ips cells. john gergen was the first to hiypothesize that genomes would -- 40 years wlaert yamanaka confirmed and expapded on his thesis. creating and reproducing diseased cells in the lab. members of the nobel committee says their work has made an important contribution to new medical research. professor yamanaka spoke about his nobel prize win at kyoto university. >> translator: i am very happy about receiving this prize. but at the same time i feel a great sense of responsibility. ips is a new technology and it
transactions. >> the nobel prize for physics goes to the scientists from france and the u.s. >> we began in greece where tens of thousands of angry protesters filled the streets of athens on tuesday to greet german chancellor angela merkel. >> it is her first visit there since the eurozone crisis erupted. she reaffirmed their commitment to keep the debt-ridden state inside your's single currency but offered no promise of further aid. >> a new report on the greek reform process is due next month, and in the meantime, greece is negotiating highly unpopular austerity measures. protesters blamed merkel. >> this morning's peaceful protest turned violent in their early afternoon. police used tear gas to disperse demonstrators. some 40,000 people took to the streets of athens to express their anger with the eu, the austerity measures, and the german chancellor. safely away from the protests, angela merkel said she understood the problems facing many greeks. she promised help as athens performs its health system. >> i believe it will be worth it in the long run. if problems are not solved now, t
are stationed in afghanistan, mostly from the u.s. some nations want to speed up the pull out of the soldiers. but they confirm no changes to the withdrawal plan. ministers insist military police control an area covering three-quarters of the country's population. they also agree to draw up plans to train to handle the aftermath of the combat troop withdrawal. nato secretary general insisted the schedule is based on objective assessments of the situation in afghanistan. >> it's not because partners rush for the exit. it's not because of lack of cohesion within our coalition. on the contrary. >> but relations between nato-led forces and afghanistan have been strained by insider attacks. afghan military and police, or people wearing afghan uniforms, have killed more than 50 foreign soldiers this year. >>> people in north korea are marking the 67th anniversary of the founding of the ruling workers party. it's the first time the new leader, kim jong un, has overseen the celebrations. north koreans lined up on the hill in pyongyang to offer flowers in front of statues of the late heads of state ki
the eu must finally decide. >> our correspondent is at the summit and joins us now from brussels. just how big are the differences right now between germany and france? are they really that significant? or are they being played out? >> it is not unusual for positions to be fairly extreme lethal -- fairly extremely far. you have some leeway during negotiations and the media focus very much on this german franco axis because it used to be -- traditionally, it has always been the engine -- the motor that has been keeping the european union going, and usually, the french and german chancellor and president would meet in the run-up to summits. they only did that today as a sort of last-minute meeting that happened before the summit, so relationships between angela merkel and francois hollande are clearly tense, but they also agree on a lot of things despite all the difference is that we hear about. they both want banking union. in fact, they agreed to that at the summit in june, so there's no doubt about that. >> this desire for agreement you are talking about -- will it lead to anything co
, but the underlying cause is a problem with the body's immune system. >> immune system works to protect us from infections, like bacteria or viruses or parasites, but sometimes, it gets confused, and it starts recognizing foods as an enemy, and it starts mounting an immune response. >> that response can range from itching to rashes called hives, vomiting, even difficulty breathing. very severe symptoms are called anaphylaxis. anaphylaxis is not only scary -- it can be deadly, and it can happen in an instant. >> your throat closes. hives all over your body. your eyes puff up. it's different for everybody, really, but it gets really fatal. [ siren wails ] >> every 10 minutes, someone in the u.s. is rushed to the emergency room with a severe allergic reaction. what's more, food allergies are becoming more common. peanut allergies alone have tripled since our parents were kids. >> i have a friend who's allergic to almonds. >> my friends are allergic to nuts, berries, and milk. >> my best friend is allergic to peanuts. >> one of my friends, she's allergic to peanuts. [ mid-tempo piano music playing
's different for everybody, ally, but it gets really fatal. [ siren wails ] ery 10 minutes, someone in the u.s. is rushed to the emergency room with a severe allergic reaction. e congorcoon.food allergies peanut alleres alone have tripled since our parents were kids. >> i have a friend who's allergic to almonds. >> my friends aralrg t nuts, berries, and milk. >> my best friend is allergic to peanuts. >> one of my friends, she's allergic to peanuts. [ d-mppio si playing ] >> unfortunately, many people don't realize just how serious food allergies can be. heather had to educate her friends and classmates and even a teacher who was using peanut candy for a science lesson. >> and s sd,hoalrg are you?" i said, "i can't be in the room if we're doing this experiment." and she dismissed me from class, meeachers, you know,eallyrning. help me out, and some teachers don't understand it. >> heather spoke about her condition at a conference in washington, d.c. she wainteby f.a.a.n., the food allergy and anaphylaxis network. >> it was really interesting 'cause i've never been with a grouof people o l unders
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)